Recycled

Recycle

The other day when I was writing another short story for all, I was asked whether I could tell one for children’s story.

“Of course I can.” immediately I said. And this is what I told:

What a beautiful bunch you are. I can tell your family cares for you. And I care about you, too. We planted our first garden on land not being cared for. It was the dirtiest landfill of trash you could ever imagine, and it was all I could see. Soil and everything else had been pushed to the very back by a large machine called the excavator. Then, they built each apartment to face either the playground out front, or the abandoned houses and trash heap in the back.

And what a sight it was:
tires all tossed,
broken glass and broken bottles,
fast food packaging torn and spotted!
Soda cans,
and did I mention – dirty diapers!

Did you know that just the presence of litter invites more littering.
And the opposite must be true, too, that no litter invites more no littering.

And did you know that cleaning up litter costs somebody something? We called our first garden, the back 40, because it took many church volunteers many days, and 40 industrial sized garbage bags to clean up the reclaimed land. There is no creativity in littering.

You can be creative and volunteer with your family or Sabbath school class to pick up trash along your road or around your home, and dispose of it properly. Perhaps plant a row of red roses, or a fig tree, or a tomato food crop.

Then, there is a reward for finding and collecting aluminum cans, and there is a greater reward for living on clean, attractive land.

Aluminum Can Densor | 2012 | Atlanta Intercel | Metropolitan Parkway |Atlanta, GA | photo by Stacy Sweeney

If you have to make trash
don’t throw it out
and if there is trash
please pick it up.
Be the best citizen,
and keep God’s planet beautiful.

~ Stacy Sweeney

Recycle

Recycle

The other day when I was writing another short story for all, I was asked whether I could tell one for children’s story.

“Of course I can.” immediately I said. And this is what I told:

What a beautiful bunch you are. I can tell your family cares for you. And I care about you, too. We planted our first garden on land not being cared for. It was the dirtiest landfill of trash you could ever imagine, and it was all I could see. Soil and everything else had been pushed to the very back by a large machine called the excavator. Then, they built each apartment to face either the playground out front, or the abandoned houses and trash heap in the back.

And what a sight it was:
tires all tossed,
broken glass and broken bottles,
fast food packaging torn and spotted!
Soda cans,
and did I mention – dirty diapers!

Did you know that just the presence of litter invites more littering.
And the opposite must be true, too, that no litter invites more no littering.

And did you know that cleaning up litter costs somebody something? We called our first garden, the back 40, because it took many church volunteers many days, and 40 industrial sized garbage bags to clean up the reclaimed land. There is no creativity in littering.

You can be creative and volunteer with your family or Sabbath school class to pick up trash along your road or around your home, and dispose of it properly. Perhaps plant a row of red roses, or a fig tree, or a tomato food crop.

Then, there is a reward for finding and collecting aluminum cans, and there is a greater reward for living on clean, attractive land.

Aluminum Can Densor | 2012 | Atlanta Intercel | Metropolitan Parkway |Atlanta, GA | photo by Stacy Sweeney

If you have to make trash
don’t throw it out
and if there is trash
please pick it up.
Be the best citizen,
and keep God’s planet beautiful.

~ Stacy Sweeney

ßooze and Canoes

“Nothing can survive in that alcoholism.
It took and killed everything in collision.” ~ §tacy §weeney

ßooze and Canoes

Nothing can survive
in that alcoholism.
It took and killed
everything in collision.

The woman I expected to be better
was not the woman who appeared.
The alcoholic can see, touch and feel,
but the disappointed children…

The disappointed children
can only sense a vapor oozing from every pore.
The exact circumstances are not posted,
but the humorous bear is there to pose.

Chewing on spruce gum patching
and on a small canoe destined,
to be summer bronze for reindeer
and the paper birch legend.

And it is tragic,
because things can not be the way they were.
And my mind is sick,
coming from a place of hurt.

I step back and detach.
It is the flip side to how much,
how often and how little
time I spend with such.

Most of it is spiritual healing you can do nothing about.
Tell me what my options are,
but to allow transparency and a newfound
peace and love to emerge.

Do not feel sorry for me, for I am not the victim here.
Feel sorry for that moving and fascinating lady,
recently released from prison,
who took an hour to read, The Lord’s Prayer.

~ §tacy §weeney

https://photos.app.goo.gl/ceI0UuKjISAN5WDA3 (spoken word recording)

Winslow Homer (1836-1910)
Bear and Canoe
Watercolor
-1895
35.4 x 50.8 cm
(13.94″ x 20″)
The Brooklyn Museum (New York, New York, United States)

The Northeaster

I feel like I got a little wordy on this one.
https://photos.app.goo.gl/C9BKLvIJLy9oCdXH3
I kept checking the word count until I passed 300. My voice does not usually sound stuffy, but it’s that time of year when my sinuses are draped in yellow pollen from trees, weeds, and grasses. I find in my jacket pockets a ready supply of soft tissues. Hay fever gets me every year.

I titled this poem after Homer’s most lovely, “The Northeaster,” where he demonstrates the movement of the Atlantic Ocean, and especially for Easter, only three weeks away. What I have written picks up the wonderful story line from the last chapter of John.

Winslow Homer |The Northeaster | 1883 | Watercolor, 14″ x 19 3/4″ | The Brooklyn Museum

The Northeaster

£et’s go back by the sea,
say our goodbyes a later date ~
three days sway beneath my blue sail
of a soul searching wait ~

the Lord prepares for our arrival
long before we hit the shore ~
cast my line in living water
in pursuit of crimson lure ~

my wide eye on the glimmering
let each wave reflect the morning ~
above and beyond a new drama,
like a curvy crest forming ~

the second and all visible
is what I’m aiming for ~
the second and all visible
is what I’m aiming for ~

shifting patterns open out
onto a far away distance ~
love is our greatest resource
ever fresh in my senses ~
ever fresh, ever fresh like salt spray on my skinses ~

and it’s hard to heal
the hurts between us ~
it takes years and years
to complete new beliefs
and structures within us ~

so, you keep looking, keep looking, keep looking
and I’ll keep loving, keep loving, keep loving
my no fair weather friend ~
I pray we don’t blow up in
the process all over again ~

~ Stacy

 

Pizza Palace

Knoxville, TN

Pizza is one of my favorite foods, and I find it best at restaurants whose names salute the pie in the sky: Sal’s, Hearth, Lupi’s, Osteria, Edgewood.

The anatomy of a pizza is pretty simple: dough, sauce, cheese, toppings. At the request of a few tried and true health foodies, I will be teaching a pizza making class tonight at First Presbyterian using a gluten free dough, a sprouted whole grain dough, a polenta crust, homemade pizza sauce, two brands of vegan mozzarella, and raw veggie toppings. I plan to make all my wonderful pizza recipes, so be ready to stay for at least 15 hours.

This doesn’t sound like pizza does it? Some people may ask, “What should I give up for Lent?” I ask, “If you know something is not good for you, why not give it up all together?” Then I was hit with a fist of fog.

Oh well, I enjoy food prep for a healthier, homemade pizza. I like holding raw ingredients in my hands and throwing fresh cut veggies on the iron skillet pan. And I would name my pizza house, Pizza Palace, after a drive in where I first watched a hand tossed pizza dough take a spin. But I had to get out of my car, tap on the window and ask.And it is where I would take my pop for his birthday today, if I was home visiting.

Pizza Sauce: 15oz can tomato sauce, 6oz can tomato paste, 2 tsp dried basil, 2 tsp dried oregano, 2 cloves minced garlic, 2 tBsp finely chopped onion, 3 tBsp olive oil. Mix well with spatula.
~ Stacy

    Hi